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Nostalgia is a funny thing. Besides drawing on personal memories, it also can create a sense of appreciation for the present moment. In the early 1980s, comic book readers found themselves experiencing different aspects of the medium that hadn’t been explored before. Titles like GrimJack, American Flagg, and Judge Dredd challenged the mainstream series published by Marvel and DC Comics. Among these creator-owned properties was Aztec Ace.

This comic makes it clear very early on that anything goes. Within the first few pages, we get a flying shark who battles a herd of laser dinosaurs. There’s a knight, a barbarian, a werewolf, a time traveler, and much more. It’s a free-for-all of superhero tropes combined with whatever other crazy, random things the writer could dream up. It’s glorious.

In the final issue of this series, the gang is faced with overwhelming odds against them. While some losses are incurred, they gain a surprising ally in their fight that may help turn the tide a bit.

This movie is a perfect example of what I love about the DC Animated Universe. That may come as a surprise, considering the films I’ve reviewed lately. I tend to be more critical of the darker, more serious ones (e.g., Injustice or Deathstroke) and instead rave about the broader, more fantastical ones (e.g., Batman: Soul of the Dragon or the recent DC Showcase). But believe it or not, the darker films were the ones that drew me to the DC Animated Universe in the first place. When done well, they’re an opportunity to explore deeper, more complex themes in a more mature way. Beware My Power does it very well.

When I reviewed Clodagh #2 earlier this year, I found it difficult to describe effectively, even though I really enjoyed it. Now in issue #3 (which will soon launch on Kickstarter), I’m finding the same problem. It’s a really compelling comic with engaging characters, but when I try to write out why, it doesn’t seem to do it justice.

Heady and psychotic: That’s how I’ll describe the second issue of Mind MGMT: Bootleg. Our hero from the first issue is now working as a recruiter to find the two other people that survived Zanzibar to work for the newly formed Mind MGMT. While the plot is pretty simple, it is not simplistic, especially if you understand the lore and story of the first series.

Spider-Man turned 60 years old this month, with a history of many stand-out stories: his origin in Amazing Fantasy #15, the first appearance of Mary Jane Watson, the first appearance of The Punisher, the black costume origin of Venom, the break-up of the marriage in One More Day. Left off this list are stories that were groundbreaking not only for the character, but for the comic book industry as a whole. These stories - in their purest, unaltered form - are included in the new IDW softcover book, Gil Kane’s Amazing Spider-Man Artisan Edition.

Here we are, eight weeks into the cataclysmic event that brought genies into the lives of every single person on Earth, granting them each one wish. With those wishes has come an incredible amount of destruction, death, and bonding, as a small group of people inside a dive bar called the Lampwick have found themselves protected thanks to a wish from the owner. In the eight weeks since things began, the world population has decreased significantly with the granting of wishes. People have become whatvever they wanted, helped others, hurt others, and made generally selfish wishes. But with time comes clarity, and, finally, this issue begins to unravel not just what is happening outside the Lampwick, but why it's happening, as well.

Interrupting a human press conference, WOL-421313’s trainers announce he has undergone illegal upgrades.

What happens when soldiers of war return home, only to find that they no longer fit in? This is a question that every generation must answer, with no easy solution. Image Comics’ The Dead Lucky tackles this subject head-on in a unique and surprising way.

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