Wenxian Tan, Fanbase Press Contributor

Wenxian Tan, Fanbase Press Contributor

Quick recap: With two legendary kings fighting over the land, Bridgette’s idea to meet a third legendary king seemed a tad batty, but then again, why not add another player to the board?

This issue marks the end of Greg Pak’s 3-year tenure on this series, and it feels like a fitting farewell. Befitting a denouement after all the tumultuous events that the crew has gone for, the tension in this issue largely lies in the possible choices of certain crew members, being faced with the possibility of a relatively safe and secure future on the Earth That Was, or one with more of the same shenanigans for the foreseeable future on the Serenity.

So… this appears to be BOOM!’s second iteration of the Angel title, after canceling the previous run in late 2020. With the Buffy the Vampire Slayer books going hard on the multiverse, it makes sense that this particular iteration is set in an alternate universe. As should be expected, some of the basics are still intact while a few characters have been remixed a bit. Angel is still a vampire, presumably with a soul. On top of running his private investigator gig, he’s also a popular actor on a TV show with Cordelia. A bunch of familiar faces turn up, too, so this almost feels like an episode of the show, but through a funhouse mirror.

With her Slayer powers on the fritz for no apparent reason in a dystopian future in which the sun no longer kills vampires, all Buffy Summers needs is a new charge to keep alive. Which is, of course, why she now has a young Potential crashing with her. Oh, never mind that it’s Willow and Tara’s daughter.

Previously on Buffy the Vampire Slayer:  With allies, both from this universe and the multiverse converging on Sunnydale High, Operation Slayerverse is a go.

Quick recap: Having found the secret armory of William Shakespeare, our merry band of monster hunters came face to face with Mary’s well-trained scope aimed right at Bridgette.

After a fairly tense last issue, we had Mal coming to terms with his grief and PTSD with Inara by his side, while the rest of the Serenity crew along with the Earthers and Workers had kind of come to a new arrangement.

The rundown: Think Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol with Jayne Cobb as your misguided, possibly misunderstood, and definitely maligned star.

From a first read, Daisy comes across as a supernatural thriller with a solid whack of horror. If you’re a fan of dark apocryphal stories (Think the Bible through the lens of Guillermo del Toro.), this should definitely be on your to-read list. Seemingly at the center of the story is Daisy Phillips, a teenage giant who may be a descendant of the Nephilim, the giant progeny of angels and human women. Much of the first issue is exposition heavy, but it still manages to find its heart in the mystery of a missing child and a mother’s quest to find her.

Set in the not-so-distant future in an alternate universe where the sun has mysteriously lost its potency, Buffy Summers is the last remaining Slayer. With new laws to guarantee that vampires and humans can coexist in harmony, it’s an entirely different world for Buffy, where Slayers are obsolete and on the endangered list. That, and she’s also in her 50s, with her Slayer powers acting all wonky. To add to her heaping plate of troubles, a mysterious teenage girl shows up seeking a very specific brand of assistance.

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